Interview with David Isserman from RareShare

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rareshareRareShare was co-founded by David Isserman and Eric Steel in early 2008 on the idea that there is a better way to bring together patients, families and healthcare professionals to share knowledge and personal experiences about rare medical disorders.

While rare disorders may seem to impact only a small portion of the population, together they affect over 30 million individuals in the United States and Europe alone.

Due to the comparably low level of occurrences of individual rare disorders, there is often a lack of information and support for patients and their families. Our communities are designed for people to share experiences, explore treatment options and find support among others affected by the same disorders.

David Isserman is an experienced entrepreneur with a passion for building companies. Over the years, David has amassed a broad range of knowledge working in the technology, consumer products, retail, biotech, and public relations industries. Prior to founding RareShare, David founded Isserman Consulting, a successful communications and strategy consultancy that advised early-stage companies. Before that, he was a co-founder of The Selling Block, a company specializing in asset liquidation for businesses, which he sold in 2006. David holds a Bachelor’s in Business from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business and is currently an MBA candidate at Columbia Business School in New York.

Eric Steele’s background centers around the financing and operations of high growth technology firms. Prior to RareShare, Eric founded ForePoint Networks, a wireless internet service provider delivering high-speed connectivity throughout rural Indiana. Eric has extensive experience working with angel and venture investors and has assisted in closing multiple rounds of financing in both management and consulting roles. Eric is actively involved in the community and sits on numerous boards ranging from entrepreneurship to community outreach.

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Interview with Dr. Amir Hannan

About Dr. Amir Hannan

Dr Amir Hannan is a full time General Practitioner at Haughton Thornley Medical Centres in Hyde and a founding member of the Records Access Collaborative having enabled all his patients to be able to have full access to GP held records via the internet if they wish for over three years. Over 600 patients of his are now accessing their GP records this way. He has helped to develop a practice website, www.htmc.co.uk, which supports patients, clinicians and managers in a world where information and services can be made available for patients and their families.

He is the Information Management &Technology lead for NHS Tameside and Glossop (formerly known as Tameside & Glossop PCT), having recently stepped down as Clinical Governance lead and as a Professional Executive Committee (PEC) member. He is also a member of the local Care Record Development Board supporting patients, clinicians and managers to understand how personal health information can be shared across a health and social care setting and to promote best practice by combining local expertise with national and international experience and knowledge. He has recently become the Primary Care IT lead for NHS North-West (formerly known as North-West Strategic Health Authority) and is a member of the Map of Medicine strategy group, NHS North-West.

He is also the Greater Manchester NHS Clinical Assessment and Treatment Service clinical lead on behalf of Greater Manchester PCTs. Dr Hannan has written and lectured extensively on health informatics matters and his experience to date. He is also a member of the HealthSpace Reference Panel (www.healthspace.nhs.uk) as well as the National Clinical Reference Panel for the Summary Care Record within NHS Connecting for Health (www.connectingforhealth.nhs.uk). He is a member of the Clinical Leaders Network (www.cln.nhs.uk); a member of the Primary Healthcare Specialist Group (www.phcsg.org), a branch of the British Computer Society; and a member of the editorial board of the “Journal of Communication in Healthcare”. He feels most patients should become eMPOWERed in order to support Real-Time Digital Medicine!

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Interview with David Doherty from 3G Doctor

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About the interview

David Doherty is the Head of Business Development at 3G Doctor, an innovative mHealth startup based in Ireland. Following studies in Medicine at University College Hospital in London, David began to research and design a remote care solution that would provide patients with a means of private and economical access to the attentions of a registered Doctor. The rapid adoption of 3G Video Phones in the UK and Ireland has created this new point of care for more than 8 million patients.

3G Doctor provides a service to the public offering informed consultations with registered Doctors using 3G Video Mobiles. 3G Doctor also provides free tools that help patients securely create, manage and share their important health information using their mobile phone.

David gave a presentation at the eHealth 2008 Conference at City University London titled “Connected Care: Adding Value to the Electronic Record”:

He got in touch with Mohammad after hearing about HealthCamp UK and looks forward to getting involved in the next event.

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Interview with Dr. Brian Fisher from PAERS

Dr Brian Fisher is a GP at Wells Park Surgery, and project executive & clinical lead at PAERS Limited (Patient Access to their Electronic Records System – www.paers.co.uk). He realised that it was important to give patients access to their record and that this would involve solving a number of issues. Brian managed to secure some initial funding to get a project to look at this started. Dr Simon Henley-Castleden was appointed as project manager and funding streams and collaborators were investigated.

PAERS Limited is a small independent company set up by doctors to provide tools for General Practitioners to enhance services for their patients through the use of touch screen kiosk technology. It was established as a company in the summer of 2003, building on the success of Brian’s pilot project providing patients access to their own electronic medical record.

Currently there are two PAERS Kiosks available:

  1. PAERS Records: ‘A self-contained system which allows patients to access and navigate around their GP electronic medical record autonomously, and which provides them with the information that they need to understand the medical terminology.’
  2. PAERS Arrivals: ‘A self-contained system which allows patients to independently”Arrive” themselves for an appointment at the practice. The patient is informed of who they are seeing and the approximate wait until their appointment. The practice administrative system is updated to reflect the arrival of the patient.’

Brian presented a ligthning talk at the HealthCamp UK 2008, where he met Mohammad.

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Interview with Dr. Mohammad Al-Ubaydli

Interview with Dr. Mohammad Al-Ubaydli, recorded by Dr. David Kibbe on 29 August 2008.

David Kibbe: Welcome, this is David Kibbe, Dr. David Kibbe, and you are listening to the first of our podcasts on the InterHealth Network. My guest today is Mohammad Al-Ubaydli who is the founder of a new web portal for patients known as Patients Know Best. Mohammad, thank you for being our first interview.

Mohammad Al-Ubaydli: Glad to be so, thank you.

DK: I’ve known you for several years. I know a little bit about your background as a physician, I know a little bit about your background as an informaticist, why don’t you give us a short overview of your career so far?

MAU: I went to medical school about 10-15 years by now. I graduated in 2000. When I first went to medical school, the thing that interested me was the use of computer science – chaos science – because the body is full of chaotic systems. But soon after getting into the hospital problems – actual chaos rather than chaos science – that could be improved by someone knowing a little bit of IT. And so I just began doing lots of projects helping people with computer problems that then improved patient care.

I guess the common thread through everything that I have been doing is that I like a technology that helps people in low cost commitment and really gets lots of people collaborating.

So the first thing I started with was just mobile computers. Just using Personal Digital Assistants and convincing every physician I worked with to just buy it out of pocket and then just working together and beaming information back and forth. And so that just really helped with handovers in the hospital.

The next thing is open source software because it is easy to install it and you get something that really supports collaboration across different institutions. The thing that grabbed me over the last couple of years, and this is where you and I have been working a lot quite closely is the advent of personal health records. There have been a number of developments in the last few years that mean that the investment for a patient of physician to use this is reasonably low. The common platform that are around really allow collaboration. This means that in the next 10 years there are tools that could really change how clinicians and patients interact. And I just find that very interesting. Continue reading

Health 2.0 Podcasts — Interviews with people of interest

It’s with great pleasure that I join the Patients Know Best project by interviewing the people and organizations of Health 2.0, here and abroad.  Over the last couple of years I have learned a lot from consumers, patients, physicians, developers, entrepreneurs, and bloggers about the ways in which the Internet and Web are being used to change the way health is achieved and health care provided.

So, here we go. Happy listening!

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